The current scientific view is that there is no meaning to life beyond simply existing.

Dr. Steven Taylor, PhD, argues against this:

Fortunately, we don’t just have to go through intense suffering to experience these effects. There are also certain temporary states of being when we can sense meaning. Usually this is when our minds are fairly quiet, and we feel at ease with ourselves — for example, when we’re walking in the countryside, swimming in the ocean, or after we’ve meditated or done yoga, or after sex. There is a sense of “rightness” about things. We can look above us at the sky and sense something benevolent in it, a harmonious atmosphere. We can sense a kind of radiance filling the landscape around us, emanating from the trees and fields. We can sense it flowing between us and other people — as a radiant connectedness, a sense of warmth and love. We feel glad to be alive and feel a wide-ranging sense of appreciation and gratitude.

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