Robert Vinet

Insatiably Curious

How veggie burgers became the NBA’s new Gatorade

Chris Ballard at Sports Illustrated writes »

Among those fortunate few was a cohort of NBA players; in addition to Redick, Irving and Paul, investors included Victor Oladipo, Harrison Barnes and DeAndre Jordan, none of whom, it’s safe to say, needed a windfall. Most weren’t in it for the cash; rather, they are both converts and proselytizers. Some, like Paul and Redick, eat both plant and animal protein. Others, like Jordan—who was recently in New York hyping the Beyond Sausage Breakfast Sandwich at Dunkin’ Donuts—have gone, as Redick says, “full vegan on us.”

The NBA connection makes sense, at least in one respect. Today’s players are constantly seeking micro advantages. The Lakers traveled with a bone broth chef at Kobe Bryant’s behest; LeBron James uses cryotherapy. If a plant-based diet really can extend a playing career—as Brown contends and many believe—then reducing meat intake is worth the trade-off.

From another perspective, however, the idea that NBA players are now the face of veggie burgers represents a seismic shift—both in business strategy and in people’s views on food, sports and masculinity.

Read more »

The 100 best books of the 21st century so far, according to The Guardian

Follow the link for The Guardian’s pick of the best books since 2000.

Their Top 10 are »

  1. Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel (2009)
  2. Gilead by Marilynne Robinson (2004)
  3. Secondhand Time by Svetlana Alexievich (2013), translated by Bela Shayevich (2016)
  4. Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro (2005)
  5. Austerlitz by WG Sebald (2001), translated by Anthea Bell (2001)
  6. The Amber Spyglass by Philip Pullman (2000)
  7. Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (2015)
  8. Autumn by Ali Smith (2016)
  9. Cloud Atlas David Mitchell (2004)
  10. Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (2006)

Atlanta International is the world’s busiest airport

More than 107 million passengers flew through Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport last year, making it the busiest passenger airport in the world for the 21st year in a row.
Atlanta also saw a 3.3% increase in passenger traffic, according to Airports Council International’s world traffic report, which was released on September 16.
Globally, passenger traffic increased to 8.8 billion last year, a 6.4% increase, while air cargo shipments increased by 3.4%.

Saudi Arabia shuts down about half its oil production following coordinated drone strikes » Expect prices at the pump to go up (Updated Sept 16)

Sept 16

» Oil prices surge nearly 20% after attack on Saudi facilities – Reuters

» Oil prices trading at their highest levels since May – CNN

Sept 15

» Oil price spikes expected after drone attacks on Saudi facilities – Axios

Sept 14

The production shutdown amounts to a loss of about 5.7 million barrels a day, the kingdom’s national oil company said, roughly 5% of the world’s daily production of crude oil.

Officials said they hoped to restore production to its regular level of 9.8 million barrels a day by Monday. Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said lost production would be offset through supplies of oil already on hand.

» Read more from Summer Said, Jared Malsin, and Jessica Donati at the Wall Street Journal…

» US Secretary of State Michael Pompeo blamed Iran for attacks on a massive Saudi Aramco oil facility

Glory to Hong Kong

Updated Sept 15

Video from the BBC »

Sept 13

With information from VOA: Thousands of people crowded shopping centers around Hong Kong, Thursday, September 12, for late-night flash mob-like displays of peaceful protest, belting out “Glory to Hong Kong”, a new protest song, in an act of resistance and support for the protestors in their months-long fight for democratic freedoms in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory.

The protesters have adopted the song, penned anonymously, as their anthem. The lyrics reflect protesters’ vow not to surrender despite a government concession to axe a proposed extradition law that sparked the summer of unrest.

 

Increasing number of American citizens are barred from leaving China

“They are trapped. They are alone. They are desperate to come home,” David Pressman, the siblings’ New York-based attorney, told USA TODAY. “They are literally breaking down.”

The Lius are subject to a so-called “exit ban,” and they’re not they only ones.

Another American citizen, Huang Wan, says Chinese officials are using a “fake” legal case to prevent her from returning to the United States. An Australian resident, Yuan Xiaoliang, has been barred from leaving China for more than eight months, and her husband, an Australian citizen, has been arrested on suspicion of spying, according to Australia’s foreign minister.

The State Department has warned Americans about China’s growing use of exit bans – stating in a Jan. 3 travel advisory that Chinese authorities have sometimes used exit bans to keep Americans in China for years.

“China uses exit bans coercively,” the State Department cautioned, “to compel U.S. citizens to participate in Chinese government investigations, to lure individuals back to China from abroad, and to aid Chinese authorities in resolving civil disputes in favor of Chinese parties.”

» Read more about China’s ban in an article by Deirdre Shesgreen on USA TODAY… 

Tributes to Robert Frank (1924 – 2019)

‘A wart-covered picture of America by a joyless man,” wrote the photographer and critic Minor White. “A sad poem by a very sick person,” snorted Popular Photography.

The object of their scorn was The Americans, a collection of images of American life by the photographer Robert Frank, who died last week, aged 94.

It is difficult today to recognise how revolutionary was Frank’s work when it was first published 60 years ago. His style, his mode of observation, his subject matter have all become so ingrained in contemporary photography that one can gauge their impact only by the derision that rained down upon him from mainstream critics.

» Robert Frank, a true American revolutionary » Kenan Malik, The Guardian

If Robert Frank’s legacy rests mainly on The Americans, it is worth remembering how restless his creative imagination was, from the freeform anarchy of films like Pull My Daisy, an unruly evocation of the Beat aesthetic featuring Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg, to the infamous Cocksucker Blues, his verite and decidedly downbeat take on life on the road with the Rolling Stones at their most glamorously debauched.

Frank’s singular vision did not sit well with Mick Jagger, who set out to suppress the film. “They sent lawyers, they sent planes, they sent the sheriff,” he told me, laughing, “It was out of proportion, like everything they did. It was comical really. I fled to Nova Scotia. I just wanted to be left alone.” In his absence, the Stones won a prohibitive court order that banned its screening unless Frank himself was present. Its infamy grew accordingly.

» Robert Frank: the outsider genius whose photographs laid bare America’s soul » Sean O’Hagan, The Guardian

» Remembering Robert Frank, 1924-2019 » Jim Goldberg, Martin Parr, Thomas Hoepker, Matt Stuart » Hannah Abel-Hirsch and Marigold Warner, British Journal of Photography

» Robert Frank’s Legacy: Nine Photographers Reflect » Eli Reed, Justine Kurland, Alec Soth, Eugene Richards, Ruddy Roye, Nina Berman, Joseph Rodriguez, Elinor Carucci, Jim Goldberg » NY Times

» Robert Frank’s groundbreaking works » Deutsche Welle

» Robert Frank, 1924-2019: He Saw America Without Illusions » Mary Panzer, Wall Street Journal

Robert Frank, 1954.

Robert Frank was 94.

« Older posts

© 2020 Robert Vinet

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑