Robert Vinet

VOYAGER​

Category: Canada (page 1 of 3)

Couple donates shopping spree groceries to Calgary Food Bank

Sarah Rieger writing for the CBC:

A couple who won a grocery shopping spree were motivated to go as quickly as they could on Saturday, because they weren’t filling their own pantry.

Chantal Leroux and her partner Ryan Warren won a contest to grab as many items, up to $500, as they could in 50 seconds from Bragg Creek Foods.

“We were really excited to receive the call,” said Leroux. “I immediately envisioned grabbing all sorts of things for my own cupboard and then after I reflected a couple seconds later, I thought what a great opportunity to be able to give back.”

Watch Ryan Warren grab nearly $600 worth of groceries in less than a minute »

Continue reading

Women Deliver 2019 Global Conference in Vancouver

In 40 days Canada hosts the Women Deliver 2019 Global Conference in Vancouver—the world’s largest gathering on gender equality and the health, rights, and well-being of women and girls.

#GenderEqualityMatters #WD2019

Canadians take a stand against bullying on Pink Shirt Day

It’s February 27th, and that means it’s Pink Shirt Day in Canada.

#PinkShirtDay is the Number 1 trending on Twitter in Canada as I write this.

Find out what is Pink Shirt Day is all about via CBC.

Toronto Star – Canadians ‘stand together’ against bullying on annual Pink Shirt Day

Albert Elliott gives to community he loves

Albert Elliott spends his days as a crossing guard, helping to keep young people safe as they get to and from school. And virtually every evening, he can be found at a Moncton homeless shelter, where he helps with dinner and sets up beds for the night.

On Facebook, Charlie Burrell, who runs the shelter, posted a tribute to Albert Elliott:

“He is an exceptional, loving human being with a heart of gold, and he’s always so happy and positive.”

Read more at CBC

Canadian government vows to pull two million out of poverty within 12 years, without increased spending

The Canadian Liberal government is looking to lift two million Canadians out of poverty by 2030 without committing to new spending.

Justin Trudeau’s government will introduce legislation “as early as possible” to entrench the official poverty line into law. The new plan links multiple federal programs to efforts to reduce poverty and predicts those measures will lift about 650,000 Canadians out of poverty by 2019, next year.

Social Development Minister Jean-Yves Duclos pointed to a list of already announced federal programs to reach that goal.

Duclos was in Vancouver Tuesday to unveil the Liberal’s anti-poverty plan, called “Opportunity for All — Canada’s First Poverty Reduction Strategy.”

It calls for a reduction in the rate of poverty by 20 per cent from 2015 levels by 2020 and by 50 per cent by 2030.

That would mean about 2.1 million people would no longer live under the poverty line within 12 years.

Read More at CBC

 

Best countries in the world in 2018

U.S. News & World Report has released their annual “Best Countries” index.

They evaluated 80 countries and surveyed 21,000 people from four regions (the Americas, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East and Africa). Countries were graded 65 different ways, from how well they rank in “citizenship,” “cultural influence,” “education,” “heritage,” “power,” to “quality of life,” to name a few.

Interestingly, both the UK and the USA are down one position in this year’s rankings.

  1. Switzerland
  2. Canada
  3. Germany (up 1 from 2017)
  4. United Kingdom (down 1 from 2017)
  5. Japan
  6. Sweden
  7. Australia (up 1 from 2017)
  8. United States (down 1 from 2017)
  9. France
  10. Netherlands (up 1 from 2017)

More at US News & World Report

If you are looking for a job, BMO ranks Canada’s best cities for jobs and affordable homes

Five years ago the top five cities were Regina, Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon, and Hamilton.

This year the top five are Ottawa, Quebec City, Hamilton, Edmonton, and Windsor.

Huffington Post:

“There are two key reasons to move,” BMO senior economist Robert Kavcic wrote in the report. “To find a job, if you don’t have one; or to take a better-paying job, if you do.”

BMO’s “ranking of labour market attractiveness,” as the report calls it, is purely data-driven. “Mountains vs. lakes, or seafood vs. beef, are among many other important considerations, but such lifestyle factors are ignored here,” Kavcic wrote.

BMO looked at factors such as median household income, job growth, house prices and rental rates to determine their rankings.

Top 10 most popular cars made in Canada

  1. Honda Civic
  2. Honda CR-V
  3. Toyota RAV4
  4. Toyota Corolla
  5. Dodge Grand Caravan
  6. Chevrolet Equinox
  7. Ford Edge
  8. Lexus RX
  9. Chrysler Pacifica
  10. Dodge Charger

Read about it at Driving.ca

28% of Canadians fear bankruptcy

Twenty-seven per cent claim they have no wiggle room after covering their monthly obligations. Another 44% say they’re within $200 of insolvency every month.

Why Canada is able to do things better

The Atlantic:

There hasn’t been a new major airport constructed in the United States since 1995. And the existing stock of terminals is badly in need of upgrades. Much of the surrounding road and rail infrastructure is in even worse shape (the trip from LaGuardia Airport to midtown Manhattan being particularly appalling). Washington, D.C.’s semi-functional subway system feels like a World’s Fair exhibit that someone forgot to close down. Detroit’s 90-year-old Ambassador Bridge—which carries close to $200 billion worth of goods across the Canada-U.S. border annually—has been operating beyond its engineering capacity for years. In 2015, the Canadian government announced it would be paying virtually the entire bill for a new bridge (including, amazingly, the U.S. customs plaza on the Detroit side), after Michigan’s government pled poverty. “We are unable to build bridges, we’re unable to build airports, our inner city school kids are not graduating,” is how JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon summarized the state of things during an earnings conference call last week. “It’s almost embarrassing being an American citizen.”

And

The Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), a group of 35 wealthy countries, ranks its members by overall tax burden—that is, total tax revenues at every level of government, added together and then expressed as a percentage of GDP—and in latest year for which data is available, 2014, the United States came in fourth to last. Its tax burden was 25.9 percent—substantially less than the OECD average, 34.2 percent. If the United States followed that mean OECD rate, there would be about an extra $1.5 trillion annually for governments to spend on better schools, safer roads, better-trained police, and more accessible health care.

It’s really quite simple: When Canadian governments need more money, they raise taxes. Canadians are not thrilled when this happens. But as Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. put it, taxes are the price paid “for civilized society.” And one of the reasons Canada strikes many visitors as civilized is that the rules of arithmetic generally are understood and respected on both sides of the political spectrum. When Prime Minister Justin Trudeau hiked the marginal income-tax rate up over 50 percent on rich taxpayers, right-wing commentators expressed disapproval—but the issue was relegated to the status of political subplot.

« Older posts

© 2019 Robert Vinet

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑