Robert Vinet

Traveller

Category: Humanitarianism (page 1 of 2)

As of September 13 celebrity chef José Andrés and the World Central Kitchen have served more than 200,000 free meals to people in the Bahamas following Hurricane Dorian

World Central Kitchen, which provides meals in areas hit by natural disasters, has been distributing food in the Carolinas, Florida and the Bahamas since Hurricane Dorian hit early last week. It announced its 100,000-meal landmark in a tweet on Monday evening with a photo of Andrés, who founded the organization in response to the 2010 earthquake that devastated Haiti.

The organization’s relief efforts are currently focused on the Bahamas, where the death toll from the hurricane currently stands at 50 and continues to rise. Dorian is the most powerful hurricane on record to hit that country.

“We are cooking for the people, and plan on ramping that up even more and more,” said Zomi Frankcom, the nonprofit’s relief administration manager, in a video she posted from the Grand Bahama International Airport in Freeport on Tuesday. Behind her, the airport appeared in bad shape — hangars were “ripped open like sardine cans,” as she put it. There were no other people in sight.

» Read more at WAMU…

The scale of the devastation in the storm-ravaged Bahamas following Hurricane Dorian is simply massive » 76,000 people in need of immediate life-saving assistance » Updated Sept 12

Sept 12

» Officially 50 people are dead.

» 2,500 are listed as missing, and presumed to be dead.

» Some 76,000 people have lost almost everything.

» Damage estimated at US$7 Billion.

» US gov’t denies temporary protected status to Bahamian victims of Hurricane Dorian

 

Sept 9

» At least 45 people are dead » Hundreds more are missing » Some 70,000 are homeless.

» There is no power or running water.

» Aid is arriving slowly.

» Damage one usually witnesses in a war zone.

» More at CNN…

 

Sept 7

NBC reports »

» 43 people confirmed dead in Bahamas as Hurricane Dorian toll expected to rise ‘significantly’

»

CBC reports »

» “Charities, government agencies and even cruise ships loaded with supplies and volunteers rushed emergency aid …”

» …hundreds and perhaps thousands remained missing in the archipelago nation of about 400,000 people”

» “The United Nations estimated 70,000 people were in “immediate need of life-saving assistance” such as food, water and shelter.”

More at The Guardian,


Sept 5

» Accessing damage in the Bahamas » Photos » NY Mag

» At least 20 30 lives have been lost » Some estimates are in the thousands of lives lost.

» The Red Cross is reporting that as many as 13,000 homes have been severely damaged or destroyed across the Bahamas » BBC…

The world’s largest humanitarian crisis » 24 Million people in need of aid in Yemen

DW News »

As the war in Yemen enters its fifth year and millions rely on aid to survive, public hospitals are struggling to treat even those who need intensive care. Doctors say there are not enough beds and not enough medicine. Many medical professionals are working unpaid because the government has stopped paying salaries for a number of public-sector jobs, such as for teachers and doctors. According to the UN, an estimated 80% of the population, 24 million people, require some form of humanitarian or protection assistance, including 14.3 million who are in acute need.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette newsroom donates it’s $15,000 Pulitzer award for coverage of a synagogue shooting to Tree of Life congregation

Good people.

The newspaper was honored with a Pulitzer for its coverage of the shooting deaths of 11 people and the wounding of seven others Oct. 27 at the Tree of Life Congregation in Squirrel Hill. The judges called the staff’s work “immersive, compassionate coverage … that captured the anguish and resilience of a community thrust into grief.”

But what to do with that $15,000? Staffers felt the horrendous events of that day made it difficult to fully savor one of the country’s highest honors for journalistic achievement. And splitting the monetary award among those who had participated in the news coverage just didn’t seem right.

PG Publisher John Robinson Block had a suggestion — donate the prize money to Tree of Life to help it repair its bullet-riddled temple in Squirrel Hill.

Read More…

Couple donates shopping spree groceries to Calgary Food Bank

Sarah Rieger writing for the CBC:

A couple who won a grocery shopping spree were motivated to go as quickly as they could on Saturday, because they weren’t filling their own pantry.

Chantal Leroux and her partner Ryan Warren won a contest to grab as many items, up to $500, as they could in 50 seconds from Bragg Creek Foods.

“We were really excited to receive the call,” said Leroux. “I immediately envisioned grabbing all sorts of things for my own cupboard and then after I reflected a couple seconds later, I thought what a great opportunity to be able to give back.”

Watch Ryan Warren grab nearly $600 worth of groceries in less than a minute »

Continue reading

Down With Adventure

Spending time outdoors has created a unique bond between Melody Buck Forsyth and her daughter Ruby, who was born with Down syndrome.

Through their goal to visit all 61 national parks, the family hopes to inspire others.

Thank you to REI for producing this video.

Life is Not Lost by Dying

Life is not lost by dying; life is lost minute by minute, day by dragging day, in all the thousand small uncaring ways.

~ Stephen Vincent Benét (Jul 22, 1898 – Mar 13, 1943)

From Wikipedia:

Stephen Vincent Benét was an American poet, short story writer, and novelist. He is best known for his book-length narrative poem of the American Civil War John Brown’s Body, for which he won a Pulitzer Prize in 1929, and for the short stories “The Devil and Daniel Webster” and “By the Waters of Babylon”.

Canadians take a stand against bullying on Pink Shirt Day

It’s February 27th, and that means it’s Pink Shirt Day in Canada.

#PinkShirtDay is the Number 1 trending on Twitter in Canada as I write this.

Find out what is Pink Shirt Day is all about via CBC.

Toronto Star – Canadians ‘stand together’ against bullying on annual Pink Shirt Day

Albert Elliott gives to community he loves

Albert Elliott spends his days as a crossing guard, helping to keep young people safe as they get to and from school. And virtually every evening, he can be found at a Moncton homeless shelter, where he helps with dinner and sets up beds for the night.

On Facebook, Charlie Burrell, who runs the shelter, posted a tribute to Albert Elliott:

“He is an exceptional, loving human being with a heart of gold, and he’s always so happy and positive.”

Read more at CBC

The Omlette Guy on the Appalachian Trail

This made me smile. Good people offering kindness and support to people they have only just met. Fantastic.

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