Robert Vinet

Insatiably Curious

Category: Living Better (page 1 of 44)

How veggie burgers became the NBA’s new Gatorade

Chris Ballard at Sports Illustrated writes »

Among those fortunate few was a cohort of NBA players; in addition to Redick, Irving and Paul, investors included Victor Oladipo, Harrison Barnes and DeAndre Jordan, none of whom, it’s safe to say, needed a windfall. Most weren’t in it for the cash; rather, they are both converts and proselytizers. Some, like Paul and Redick, eat both plant and animal protein. Others, like Jordan—who was recently in New York hyping the Beyond Sausage Breakfast Sandwich at Dunkin’ Donuts—have gone, as Redick says, “full vegan on us.”

The NBA connection makes sense, at least in one respect. Today’s players are constantly seeking micro advantages. The Lakers traveled with a bone broth chef at Kobe Bryant’s behest; LeBron James uses cryotherapy. If a plant-based diet really can extend a playing career—as Brown contends and many believe—then reducing meat intake is worth the trade-off.

From another perspective, however, the idea that NBA players are now the face of veggie burgers represents a seismic shift—both in business strategy and in people’s views on food, sports and masculinity.

Read more »

The 100 best books of the 21st century so far, according to The Guardian

Follow the link for The Guardian’s pick of the best books since 2000.

Their Top 10 are »

  1. Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel (2009)
  2. Gilead by Marilynne Robinson (2004)
  3. Secondhand Time by Svetlana Alexievich (2013), translated by Bela Shayevich (2016)
  4. Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro (2005)
  5. Austerlitz by WG Sebald (2001), translated by Anthea Bell (2001)
  6. The Amber Spyglass by Philip Pullman (2000)
  7. Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (2015)
  8. Autumn by Ali Smith (2016)
  9. Cloud Atlas David Mitchell (2004)
  10. Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (2006)

Legendary Annie Lennox talks with Ari Melber about the Eurythmics, fame, feminism, and ‘letting go’

Tributes to Robert Frank (1924 – 2019)

‘A wart-covered picture of America by a joyless man,” wrote the photographer and critic Minor White. “A sad poem by a very sick person,” snorted Popular Photography.

The object of their scorn was The Americans, a collection of images of American life by the photographer Robert Frank, who died last week, aged 94.

It is difficult today to recognise how revolutionary was Frank’s work when it was first published 60 years ago. His style, his mode of observation, his subject matter have all become so ingrained in contemporary photography that one can gauge their impact only by the derision that rained down upon him from mainstream critics.

» Robert Frank, a true American revolutionary » Kenan Malik, The Guardian

If Robert Frank’s legacy rests mainly on The Americans, it is worth remembering how restless his creative imagination was, from the freeform anarchy of films like Pull My Daisy, an unruly evocation of the Beat aesthetic featuring Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg, to the infamous Cocksucker Blues, his verite and decidedly downbeat take on life on the road with the Rolling Stones at their most glamorously debauched.

Frank’s singular vision did not sit well with Mick Jagger, who set out to suppress the film. “They sent lawyers, they sent planes, they sent the sheriff,” he told me, laughing, “It was out of proportion, like everything they did. It was comical really. I fled to Nova Scotia. I just wanted to be left alone.” In his absence, the Stones won a prohibitive court order that banned its screening unless Frank himself was present. Its infamy grew accordingly.

» Robert Frank: the outsider genius whose photographs laid bare America’s soul » Sean O’Hagan, The Guardian

» Remembering Robert Frank, 1924-2019 » Jim Goldberg, Martin Parr, Thomas Hoepker, Matt Stuart » Hannah Abel-Hirsch and Marigold Warner, British Journal of Photography

» Robert Frank’s Legacy: Nine Photographers Reflect » Eli Reed, Justine Kurland, Alec Soth, Eugene Richards, Ruddy Roye, Nina Berman, Joseph Rodriguez, Elinor Carucci, Jim Goldberg » NY Times

» Robert Frank’s groundbreaking works » Deutsche Welle

» Robert Frank, 1924-2019: He Saw America Without Illusions » Mary Panzer, Wall Street Journal

Robert Frank, 1954.

Robert Frank was 94.

Blinded by the light » Using a camera flash as a weapon of self defence

It was the perfect practical weapon, I could easily feel the surface of the unit to orient the flash forward in my hand, and there was a manual trigger button that my index finger naturally lined up with.

I would explain in advance to my date that if I squeezed her arm really hard, she should close her eyes until she saw the flash. (You could see the flash through closed eyelids.) But I also realized that she might not get the message in time, so I planned to immediately pull her to safety.

The idea was to incapacitate any aggressor(s) without physically harming them and, at the same time, not allowing them to get close enough to be a real threat. All I had to do was manually point my hand in the general direction of the (maybe) bad guy(s) and squeeze the button while remembering to close my eyes for half a second. No one being hit with an unexpected flash of this magnitude and having night adjusted vision was going to be able to see anything for at least thirty seconds. By then we were back in the bar or in the car and gone.

I only used it once on two guys that were approaching from near my car and calling out, “Hey dude, got a light?”

» Read more of this article by James Speed Hensinger at PetaPixel…

The first rule of self defence is to avoid the confrontation.

But if you must, if you have no other choice, this would be better and safer, in most circumstance. Plus it’s less lethal than firearm. The object should be to stop an attack. Not to kill anyone. It would be legal too, in most, if not every country in the world.

As of September 13 celebrity chef José Andrés and the World Central Kitchen have served more than 200,000 free meals to people in the Bahamas following Hurricane Dorian

World Central Kitchen, which provides meals in areas hit by natural disasters, has been distributing food in the Carolinas, Florida and the Bahamas since Hurricane Dorian hit early last week. It announced its 100,000-meal landmark in a tweet on Monday evening with a photo of Andrés, who founded the organization in response to the 2010 earthquake that devastated Haiti.

The organization’s relief efforts are currently focused on the Bahamas, where the death toll from the hurricane currently stands at 50 and continues to rise. Dorian is the most powerful hurricane on record to hit that country.

“We are cooking for the people, and plan on ramping that up even more and more,” said Zomi Frankcom, the nonprofit’s relief administration manager, in a video she posted from the Grand Bahama International Airport in Freeport on Tuesday. Behind her, the airport appeared in bad shape — hangars were “ripped open like sardine cans,” as she put it. There were no other people in sight.

» Read more at WAMU…

The scale of the devastation in the storm-ravaged Bahamas following Hurricane Dorian is simply massive » 76,000 people in need of immediate life-saving assistance » Updated Sept 12

Sept 12

» Officially 50 people are dead.

» 2,500 are listed as missing, and presumed to be dead.

» Some 76,000 people have lost almost everything.

» Damage estimated at US$7 Billion.

» US gov’t denies temporary protected status to Bahamian victims of Hurricane Dorian

 

Sept 9

» At least 45 people are dead » Hundreds more are missing » Some 70,000 are homeless.

» There is no power or running water.

» Aid is arriving slowly.

» Damage one usually witnesses in a war zone.

» More at CNN…

 

Sept 7

NBC reports »

» 43 people confirmed dead in Bahamas as Hurricane Dorian toll expected to rise ‘significantly’

»

CBC reports »

» “Charities, government agencies and even cruise ships loaded with supplies and volunteers rushed emergency aid …”

» …hundreds and perhaps thousands remained missing in the archipelago nation of about 400,000 people”

» “The United Nations estimated 70,000 people were in “immediate need of life-saving assistance” such as food, water and shelter.”

More at The Guardian,


Sept 5

» Accessing damage in the Bahamas » Photos » NY Mag

» At least 20 30 lives have been lost » Some estimates are in the thousands of lives lost.

» The Red Cross is reporting that as many as 13,000 homes have been severely damaged or destroyed across the Bahamas » BBC…

Remember, you can’t be stuck in traffic; you are the traffic.

— Kevin Slavin

Interesting » Study links lower emotional intelligence to prejudiced, right-wing views

Not surprising.

People who score lower on emotional intelligence tests are more likely to hold right-wing and prejudice attitudes, according to new research.

Psychologists have long been interested in how personality traits and cognitive abilities relate to political ideologies and prejudice. Past research, for example, has shown that people with lower cognitive abilities are more likely to hold right-wing and prejudiced attitudes. But relatively few studies have examined how emotional intelligence factors into the mix.

and

The results echo those of a similar 2017 study, which indicated that people who scored lower in trait Emotional Intelligence were more likely to hold right-wing and subtly racist views. Why? People with lower emotional intelligence have less empathy and are less able to assume the perspective of others, the authors suggested.

» Read more at Big Think

 

The world’s largest humanitarian crisis » 24 Million people in need of aid in Yemen

DW News »

As the war in Yemen enters its fifth year and millions rely on aid to survive, public hospitals are struggling to treat even those who need intensive care. Doctors say there are not enough beds and not enough medicine. Many medical professionals are working unpaid because the government has stopped paying salaries for a number of public-sector jobs, such as for teachers and doctors. According to the UN, an estimated 80% of the population, 24 million people, require some form of humanitarian or protection assistance, including 14.3 million who are in acute need.

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