Robert Vinet

A​ Passionately Curious Bloke

Category: Uncategorized (page 2 of 10)

Together – Marko Roth’s travel story from Patagonia

Marko Roth presents Together, a short travel film about his 1,200-mile journey through Patagonia.

The world’s longest glass-bottomed bridge just opened on China’s Tianmen mountain

More photos at the BBC.

New forensic analysis indicates bones found on a remote island in the South Pacific were likely those of legendary adventurer Amelia Earhart

Science Daily:

Richard Jantz, professor emeritus of anthropology and director emeritus of UT’s Forensic Anthropology Center, re-examined seven bone measurements conducted in 1940 by physician D. W. Hoodless. Hoodless had concluded that the bones belonged to a man.

Jantz, using several modern quantitative techniques — including Fordisc, a computer program for estimating sex, ancestry, and stature from skeletal measurements — found that Hoodless had incorrectly determined the sex of the remains. The program, co-created by Jantz, is used by nearly every board-certified forensic anthropologist in the US and around the world.

The data revealed that the bones have more similarity to Earhart than to 99 percent of individuals in a large reference sample.

The new study is published in the journal Forensic Anthropology.

Source: University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Outdoor recreation has larger economic impact than mining or agriculture

Get your selfie stick out.

Kamila Kudelska, Wyoming Public Media:

The new study by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis showed that outdoor recreation accounted for two percent of the entire U.S. economy in 2016.

And

Tara Highfill, a research economist at the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, said two percent is actually very significant in the overall economy.

“That may sound small, but it’s actually quite large when you look at other industries,” she said. “For example, outdoor recreation is larger than the entire mining industry in the U.S. It’s larger than the entire agriculture industry in the U.S.”

Highfill said the most surprising finding is the size of the outdoor recreation economy and the speed at which it is growing. In 2016, the outdoor recreation economy grew 3.8 percent, compared to a growth of 2.8 percent in the overall economy. A final report will be released in September.

Study: Outdoor Recreation Satellite Account: Prototype Statistics for 2012-2016

More:
Outdoors Economy Is Bigger Than Oil – GearJunkie
Outdoor recreation was 2 percent of GDP in 2016 – TheHill

Laos is remaking itself as an adventure center, and it’s serving them well

John Henderson, Los Angeles Times:

In 1990, about 14,400 people visited landlocked Laos. By 2015, that number had swollen to 4.7 million. A country the World Bank ranked among the 10 poorest in the world in 1991 is now at 118.

I spent three weeks in February 2017 traversing the country, trekking along the northern border with China and kayaking along the Mekong River on the southern tip near Cambodia.

I started in the middle of the country, going north, then heading south, which seems not to make sense on its face but was faster than traveling north to south or the other way around.

Video: Tales of ice-bound wonderlands

A 2011 TED Talk by adventure photographer Paul Nicklen, just named one of this year’s National Geographic’s Adventures of the Year.

From TED:

Diving under the Antarctic ice to get close to the much-feared leopard seal, photographer Paul Nicklen found an extraordinary new friend. Share his hilarious, passionate stories of the polar wonderlands, illustrated by glorious images of the animals who live on and under the ice.

Video: World’s hardest climb – Dawn Wall in Yosemite National Park

National Geographic:

Prior to getting on the Dawn Wall in Yosemite National Park, the most difficult “big wall” objective in the world, Kevin Jorgeson had a very different climbing focus and style. It all changed when he was approached by Tommy Caldwell to partner up and take on the impossible.

National Geographic Announces 2018 Adventurers of the Year

On March 1, 2018 , National Geographic announced its 2018 Adventurers of the Year, an annual list that honors extraordinary achievements in the fields of exploration, adventure sports, conservation, and humanitarianism within the past year.

The list this year includes daring climbers, hardcore ultramarathoners, resilient mountain bikers, inspiring photographers, and incredible philanthropists.

‘Trailblazers’ was the guiding theme of this year’s list, meaning each honoree has achieved something unique, groundbreaking and game-changing in his or her field.

This year, honorees were nominated by past Adventurers of the Year, prominent members of the adventure community, and National Geographic Explorers and photographers. The National Geographic Adventure editorial staff reviewed all of the nominees and selected the final eight.

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Increasingly, women are travelling on their own

Laura Manske, writing in Forbes:

Patricia Schultz, renowned author of the worldwide bestseller 1,000 Places to See Before You Die and the new Global Ambassador for Trafalgar, a guided-vacations company, she explains: “There are an astonishing number of women of all ages who no longer seek or need permission — nor emotional support or encouragement from spouses, friends or colleagues — to travel. They are gutsy and bold, courageous and impressively strong. Travel breeds resourcefulness and resilience.” Women who make travel a life priority “take on roles of leadership,” she continues. “Travel helps us understand our place in the world and understand more clearly the life we want to create for ourselves. It makes us better people — and invariably better wives, mothers, sisters and friends. Travel also helps keep us humble — and tolerant and respectful of other people and other cultures.”

Canada’s MEC faces calls to drop outdoor brands owned by U.S. ammunition and gun manufacturer

Canadians are examining which outdoor equipment companies they should be supporting and looking closer at what brands they should be buying.

Vancouver-based outdoor apparel and goods retailer Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC) sells Vista Outdoor brands, including Giro, Camelbak and Blackburn.

Utah-based Vista Outdoor Inc. also designs, develops, and manufactures ammunition, long guns and related equipment under such brands as Federal PremiumBushnell, and Savage Arms.
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