The team say that once factors such as body mass index, diet, physical activity, smoking and education were taken into account, that translates to a 17% higher risk of death among those consuming two glasses a day compared with those drinking less than one glass a month.

The trend was seen for both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages. Similar results were seen for both men and women.

While sugary drinks have previously been linked to obesity, the researchers say that did not fully explain the association of high consumption with an increased risk of death.

When the team looked at specific causes of death they found frequent consumption of artificially sweetened soft drinks was associated with a higher risk of death from circulatory diseases, while sugar-sweetened soft drinks were associated with a higher risk of death from digestive disease. Soft drinks overall were also associated with a greater risk of death from Parkinson’s disease.

» Read more of the article by Nicola Davis at The Guardian…

» Updated Sept 6 » Read Death by Diet Soda? by Andrew Jacobs at the NY Times…