Robert Vinet

VOYAGER​

Tag: China

Most expensive cities for expats and foreign employees in 2018

According to Mercer’s Annual Cost of Living Survey:

  1. Hong Kong
  2. Tokyo
  3. Zurich
  4. Singapore
  5. Seoul
  6. Luanda
  7. Shanghai
  8. Ndjamena
  9. Beijing
  10. Bern

Get smarter and healthier; The first nylon stockings go on sale; Face recognition tools are staggeringly inaccurate

Apple has 55 self-driving cars registered in California – TechCrunch

Facebook closed 583 million fake accounts in first three months of 2018 – The Guardian

The number of kidnappings is surging in Mexico – VOX

Average house price in Canada fell 11% in past year – CBC

  • National home sales fall to lowest level in 5 years – CTV News

A 69-year-old double amputee from China summits Everest – Adventure Journal via Adventure Trend

Great employees quit instead of admitting they are unhappyForbes

Running out of Japanese whiskey – Kotaku

Taking a stand for what you believe in: Google employees resign in protest over work for Pentagon – Gizmodo

Watch: Learning to play an instrument can help anyone become healthier and smarter – Life Noggin via YouTube

Face recognition tools used by police are ‘staggeringly inaccurate’ – BBC

How a newspaper diesPolitico

~~~

May 15

1919The Winnipeg general strike: 24,000 organized and unorganized workers in Winnipeg walked off the job. Another 6,000 would soon join them. It was the start of the largest strike in Canadian history.

1940: The first nylon stockings go on sale; 780,000 pairs are snapped up on the first day. Four million pairs sold out in four days. The material was developed by a scientist at DuPont.

1941: New York Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio begins his record 56-game hitting streak with a single off Edgar Smith of the Chicago White Sox.

Best of the best travel destinations; Punishing treadmills; Gas prices 20% higher than last year; Epidemic of dishonesty; Are you in the wrong room?; A trainable dog-like robot; Banning trans fats; Israel turns 70

“If you’re the smartest person in the room, you’re in the wrong room.” ~ Mathieu Flamini

A Toronto mother — who donated one of her kidneys to her six-year-old son — received the greatest gift for Mother’s Day when her son was discharged from the hospital. – CTV News

Ear Worm: The Mister Softee jingle has lyrics. Who knew? – The Daily Meal

Michael Bloomberg warns of an ‘epidemic of dishonesty‘ – Associated Press

Using less plastic leads to fewer harmful chemicals in the body – Tree Hugger

24 lists combined to find the top travel destinations for 2018Forbes

  • Top 10 are: 1) Mexico; 2) Australia; 3) Italy; tied for 4th) Canada and Spain; 6) South Korea; tied for 7th) California, China, and Louisiana; tied for 10th) Argentina, Malta, and Portugal.

Boston Dynamics to start selling its dog-like SpotMini robot in 2019 – TechCrunch // Will not be as adorable but will it be easier to train than Skye, my Cairn Terrier.

The World Health Organization wants all countries to ban trans fats from foodsCBC  Trans fats increase the risk of heart disease, the No. 1 cause of death around the world. Denmark banned them 15 years ago. Canada’s ban take effect this September.

Wowzers! The average price of gasoline in Canada has hit $1.38 a litre. That’s about $4.11 US per US dollar. And don’t expect any relief any time soon. – Globe and Mail (paywall) // That is more than 20% higher than the rate of about $1.10 a year ago. That difference adds up to an extra $14 per fill for the typical driver who pumps 50 litres of fuel a week.

Treadmills were originally designed to punish prisoners – Quartz

Israel celebrates it’s 70th by shooting and killing 41 58 Palestinians (and wounding another 1,600) protesting along the border fence over the U.S. Embassy move to Jerusalem – Washington Post, BBC

~~~

May 14

1643: Four-year-old Louis XIV becomes King of France. Louis the Great rules until he died in 1715.

1948: David Ben-Gurion publicly read the Israeli Declaration of Independence at the present-day Independence Hall in Tel Aviv, officially establishing the state of Israel.

1973: The NASA space station Skylab was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida.

1984: Jeanne Sauve is sworn in as Canada’s first female governor general. She stays in office until January 28, 1990.

Chinese sperm donors must now be Communist Party loyalists

South China Morning Post:

The Third Hospital of Peking University launched a sperm donation campaign from Wednesday to run until May 23, and listed a series of requirements for the donors on its social media account.

In addition to being in good health, the hospital says donors must have “favourable political qualities”.

“[The donors must] love the socialist motherland and embrace the leadership of the Communist Party,” the notice said.

”[He must]be loyal to the party’s tasks, be decent, law-abiding and be free of any political problems.”

The Best of the Best Countries in the World

The Best of the Best, according to U.S. News & World Report:

  1. Switzerland
  2. Canada
  3. Germany
  4. United Kingdom
  5. Japan
  6. Sweden
  7. Australia
  8. United States
  9. France
  10. Netherlands
  11. Denmark
  12. Norway
  13. New Zealand
  14. Finland
  15. Italy
  16. Singapore
  17. Austria
  18. Luxembourg
  19. Spain
  20. China

More:

Katherine Lagrave, Condé Nast Traveler:

There’s a “best of” list for nearly everything—the best countries for expats, the best places to go in 2018, the best pizza in Italy (you’re welcome). Now, U.S. News & World Report has released a veritable best-of-the-best list, with its annual “Best Countries” index. This study is no joke: They evaluated 80 countries and surveyed 21,000 people from four regions (the Americas, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East and Africa); places were graded 65 different ways, for how well they rank in “citizenship,” “cultural influence,” “education,” “heritage,” “power,” “quality of life,” to name a few. Here, the ten best countries in the world, and what they’re, well, best for. Counting down… This gallery was originally published in 2016. It has been updated with new results.

The world’s longest glass-bottomed bridge just opened on China’s Tianmen mountain

More photos at the BBC.

Chinese funerals have strippers

That’s one way to make sure people attend your funeral.

Yvette Tan, BBC News:

According to one theory, strippers are used to boost funeral attendances because large crowds are seen as a mark of honour for the deceased.

Another states the practice could be linked to a “worship of reproduction”.

“In some local cultures, dancing with erotic elements can be used to convey the deceased’s wishes of being blessed with many children,” Huang Jianxing, a professor of Fujian Normal University told state-media outlet the Global Times.

Winter Olympics Day 11 Highlights

CBC Sports:

Canadian ice dancers Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir skated their way to gold with an historic performance at the 2018 Olympic Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea. They are the second pair to win two ice dance titles, joining Russia’s Pasha Grishuk and Evgeniy Platov, who earned back-to-back gold medals in 1994 and 1998. Virtue and Moir tied a figure skating ice dance world-record, total score of 206.07, with three Olympic golds, including last week’s Canada win in the team event.

Papadakis/Cizeron (FRA) are in second place with silver and Shiutani/Shibutani (USA) in third with bronze.

Canadian skier Cassie Sharpe, who suffered a broken thumb in her final pre-Olympic competition in late January, put down incredible runs in the halfpipe for top place with a score of 95.80. France’s Marie Martinod won silver.

Marianne St-Gelais, Kim Boutin, Valérie Maltais and Kasandra Bradette missed out on what appeared to be a guaranteed medal in the 3,000-metre relay final after being penalized.

Homan and the women’s curling team lost 7-5 to China and must win their final two games to qualify for the playoffs. Men’s curling team defeated Japan 8-4.

Korea bows out of men’s hockey with tears and cheers as Finland edges them to set up a meeting with Canada. The United States beat Slovakia.

Woman in China rides train station X-ray scanner rather than part with purse

Reuters

A woman in southern China accompanied her purse through a train station’s luggage x-ray machine rather than part with the bag amid the Lunar New Year holiday rush, Chinese media reported.

Video from the digital news platform Pear Video, linked on the Facebook page of the state-run People’s Daily newspaper and widely picked up online, showed a guard apparently telling the woman that, yes, small bags need to go in the machine, too.

The security video shows her leaving the screen and then emerging from the device. Still x-ray images online show a person in high heels kneeling among bags and other items.

‘Don’t’ touch the penguins’

Marwa Eltagouri, The Independent:

Last summer’s news that a behemoth iceberg detached from one of Antarctica’s largest floating ice shelves has sparked a sense of urgency among tourists eager to check the continent off their travel bucket lists.

That’s especially the case for Chinese tourists, so much so that the Chinese government earlier this week established a new list of rules for people visiting Antarctica: No hunting. No leaving behind solid waste. And no touching or feeding the penguins, according to the South China Morning Post.

© 2019 Robert Vinet

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑