Insatiably Curious

Tag: Data Breach (Page 1 of 2)

British Airways Travellers’ Credit Cards Hacked

Data breach leaves 380,000 customers vulnerable.

Hackers obtained the credit card details of some 380,000 British Airways travellers during a two-week data breach this summer that leaves the customers vulnerable to financial fraud, the airline says.

CEO Alex Cruz, said Friday that enough data was stolen to allow criminals to use credit card information for illicit purposes, and that police are investigating. Travellers who booked on the company website or mobile app from Aug. 21 until Sept. 5 may have been affected.


More at the CBC, Sunday Times

 

Should Apple really be your privacy hero?

When compared to the likes of Facebook, Google, and others, Apple are probably doing a better job. But they could be doing more.

Bloomberg Businessweek (paywall):

Bloomberg News recently reported that for years iPhone app developers have been allowed to store and sell data from users who allow access to their contact lists, which, in addition to phone numbers, may include other people’s photos and home addresses. According to some security experts, the Notes section—where people sometimes list Social Security numbers for their spouses or children or the entry codes for their apartment buildings—is particularly sensitive. In July, Apple added a rule to its contract with app makers banning the storage and sale of such data. It was done with little fanfare, probably because it won’t make much of a difference.

When developers get our information, and that of the acquaintances in our contacts list, it’s theirs to use and move around unseen by Apple. It can be sold to data brokers, shared with political campaigns, or posted on the internet. The new rule forbids that, but Apple does nothing to make it technically difficult for developers to harvest the information.

Continue reading

So far this year, US telecom companies have successfully stopped 70 state bills that would have prevented them from selling your personal data

Motherboard:

Rewind back to March 2017: Congress voted to overturn a yet-to-take-effect Obama-era FCC regulation requiring ISPs to get permission from customers before collecting their data and selling it to advertisers. It was a victory for corporate giants like Comcast and Verizon, who nevertheless assured everyone that they had no intention of selling their customers’ internet histories.

In the wake of that repeal, about half of the country’s states chose not to take the ISPs at their word, and began crafting their own legislation to restore the FCC’s rules within their borders. Washington, DC is the latest example, and the National Conference of State Legislatures shows close to 70 similar bills on state dockets this year. So far, not a single one has passed.

Hey Ferrari, the CN Tower is not in Montreal; D-Day; Facebook caught again

Walmart will pay for its workers to earn a college degree – but only in the U.S. – NY Times

What’s going on in your child’s brain when you read them a story? – NPR

Not enough cows are getting massages, leading to a shortage of luxury goods – Bloomberg // Where does one apply to become a Cow Masseur?

Apple’s Craig Federighi provided a perfect explanation for why the iPad is a bad computer replacementInsider // I agree. It’s even a pain to do some simple tasks such as cut and paste.

Do You Like Your Name? – NY Times

Facebook shared your data with at least four Chinese tech companies — Huawei, Lenovo, Oppo, and TCL — since at least 2010 – NY Times, Globe & Mail, Reuters // It’s scummy businesses like Facebook that make it necessary to have tough privacy and data protection laws.

  • ‘Sure looks like Zuckerberg lied to Congress‘ – LA Times // This was intentional and he should face the consequences.
  • Can Facebook be cut down to size? – NY Times

As a Canadian, a native Montrealer, and a huge Formula 1 fan, this is embarrassing. The Ferrari race team tweeted a video that identified the Toronto skyline as belonging to Montreal. That video has since been replaced.  And in the typical Ferrari way, there is no apology. The 2018 Canadian Grand Prix takes place in Montreal (the one without the CN Tower) on Sunday. To add insult to injury, the race is contested on the Gilles Villeneuve circuit, named in honour of one of Ferrari’s most passionate and loved race drivers. More at CTV News

Here is some of the personal information Facebook does not include in it’s ‘Download Your Data’ tool

Facebook claims users can view the personal information they have collected about you. But the download doesn’t include everything Facebook knows about you.

Nitasha Tiku, Wired:

“Download Your Data” hardly tells you everythingFacebook knows about you. Among the information not included:

  •  information Facebook collects about your browsing history
  • information Facebook collects about the apps you visit and your activity within those apps
  • the advertisers who uploaded your contact information to Facebook more than two months earlier
  • ads that you interacted with more than two months prior

Download Your Data is particularly spotty when it comes to the information Facebook taps to display ads. Typically, Facebook uses information it collects or buys to place users into categories that advertisers can target. This can include data a user provides explicitly (your age), implicitly (which browser you use) or unknowingly (information on purchases from loyalty cards).

How can you tell if your personal data was shared with Cambridge Analytica?

Facebook has published a page you can access, after you log into your account, that will tell you if the personal data Facebook collects on your was scraped by Cambridge Analytica with the “This Is Your Digital Life” app.

Remember, this is only about one app by one company. There are thousands of these apps that profile users on Facebook. They all collect your personal data to better profile users. Cambridge Analytica is only the tip of the iceberg.

Remember also that Facebook has all that personal data about you. Are you comfortable with Facebook having control of so much of your personal data?

More:

Here’s why tech companies abuse our data: because we let them – Brett Frischmann, The Guardian

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has no plans to extend European level privacy outside the EU

This is why our government needs to follow the EU’s lead with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which allows citizens to control their personal data, and brings with it severe financial penalties for companies that don’t comply.

It would not be difficult for Facebook to extend the same privacy protections to citizens outside the European Union. A flip of a switch really. Instead, they choose to be non-transparent and suck up as much user data as possible.

Reuters:

Zuckerberg told Reuters in a phone interview that Facebook was working on a version of the [European] law that would work globally, bringing some European privacy guarantees worldwide, but the 33-year-old billionaire demurred when asked what parts of the law he would not extend worldwide.

“We’re still nailing down details on this, but it should directionally be, in spirit, the whole thing,” Zuckerberg said. He did not elaborate.

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