Insatiably Curious

Tag: Environment

Experiences over gifts for Mother’s Day; Vanilla ice cream is under threat; Nelson Mandela: Let freedom reign; Trudeau regrets U.S. President’s Iran decision; The real Dr. Drai

Tourism’s carbon impact three times larger than estimated – BBC

Mom’s prefer experiences over gifts on Mother’s Day – Globe and Mail

Vanilla ice cream is under threat. A huge spike in pure vanilla extract prices is making some bakeries and ice cream makers think twice about whether to keep making it. We might be stuck with chocolate to help cool down – CBC

South Korea is cracking down on texting while walking with an app that locks devices after detecting  users have been walking for more than five steps while using their phones. – Yonhap News Agency

On Wednesday Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivered a thinly veiled rebut to the U.S. President’s backing out of the Iran nuclear weapons deal and stressed Canada remains aligned with most countries in supporting the deal – Globe and Mail This was a rare and complex deal that involved many countries. Not unlike what we are going through with North Korea, the issues on the table are pretty complex. Lets hope the rest of the world can take the lead where the US breaks promises and signed agreements, because the U.S. President is dropping the ball with his America First/America Alone policy and the world is a more dangerous place because of it.

Dr. Dre lost a trademark court battle with a gynecologist. The raper argued that Dr. Drai, the real doctor, would cause confusion among fans. – Chicago Tribune

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May 10

1994Nelson Mandela was sworn into office as the first democratically elected president of South Africa. This was a day to celebrate a historic victory over a racist regime. “Let freedom reign,” Mandela said in his inauguration speech.

Northern Norway hotel produces more energy than it uses

AnneMarie McCarthy, writing for Lonely Planet:

The Svart hotel uses 85% less energy compared to a standard, modern hotel but with the help of its own solar power, will actually produce more energy than it uses. This point is key to building the hotel in the planned site; at the foot of the Svartisen glacier in northern Norway.

Svart extends in a circle from the shoreline, giving guests a panoramic view of the clear waters of Holandsfjorden fjord and the surrounding mountains. In the summer, guests can stroll around the hotel on the boardwalk and in warmer weather they can even kayak underneath the structure.

Greenland Is Melting

Outside Magazine:

Filmmaker Jason van Bruggen and his team from Dot Dot Dash spent May in Greenland at the Swiss Camp Polar Research station with Dr. Konrad Steffen from Switzerland’s WSL research institute to investigate our changing climate. Dr. Steffen urges audiences to consider the role that they have to play in the solution. “I think that there is some kind of a myth where we need the scientists to solve this problem,” he says, “but it is the community, together with the scientists, that have to solve the problem.”

The U.S. President’s War on Public Lands

Outside Magazine Editors:

Immediately after he took office, on January 20, 2017, [U.S. President] and his officials began opening up public lands to the energy industry. Ever since, it’s been hard to keep track of all the regulation rollbacks and revoked protections.

First, there was the announcement on January 30, 2017, to reorganize government agencies, including the National Park Service and the Department of the Interior. Two weeks later, [U.S. President] repealed a rule that stopped mining companies from dumping waste into rivers. Then Ryan Zinke was confirmed as secretary of the interior, and from there the deregulation pace quickened. Zinke oversaw reviewing national monuments, streamlining oil and gas industry permits, opening Arctic waters to drilling, and, finally, shrinking two monuments in Utah.

Bears Ears Officially Opens to Oil and Gas

The promise of the national parks was to save and protect special places so all Americans may experience their heritage. The current administration is eroding this away.

J. Weston Phippen, writing in Outside Magazine:

As of 9 a.m. on Friday, the protections for what was once Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments ceased to exist, and all the surrounding public lands opened to resource extraction.

Sixty days ago, President Trump signed an order in Salt Lake City to reduce the size of the two monuments—Bears Ears by 85 percent and Grand Staircase by half. Today, they officially open to mining claims. There’s been a lot of fuss in the media about how these claims work, because they’re governed by the General Mining Law of 1872. That means anyone with motivation and four stakes can, technically, rush out and claim their own plot, as long as you have the $212 filing fee. But there probably won’t be an 1800s-style land rush.

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