Insatiably Curious

Tag: Facebook (Page 1 of 2)

Millions of Facebook users’ phone numbers found online

Honestly, does this surprise anyone?

Facebook has run fast and loose with users’ private data from the beginning.

Hundreds of millions of phone numbers linked to Facebook accounts have been found online.

The exposed server contained more than 419 million records over several databases on users across geographies, including 133 million records on U.S.-based Facebook users, 18 million records of users in the U.K., and another with more than 50 million records on users in Vietnam.

But because the server wasn’t protected with a password, anyone could find and access the database.

Each record contained a user’s unique Facebook ID and the phone number listed on the account. A user’s Facebook ID is typically a long, unique and public number associated with their account, which can be easily used to discern an account’s username.

Read more by Zack Whittaker at TechCrunch…

Should Apple really be your privacy hero?

When compared to the likes of Facebook, Google, and others, Apple are probably doing a better job. But they could be doing more.

Bloomberg Businessweek (paywall):

Bloomberg News recently reported that for years iPhone app developers have been allowed to store and sell data from users who allow access to their contact lists, which, in addition to phone numbers, may include other people’s photos and home addresses. According to some security experts, the Notes section—where people sometimes list Social Security numbers for their spouses or children or the entry codes for their apartment buildings—is particularly sensitive. In July, Apple added a rule to its contract with app makers banning the storage and sale of such data. It was done with little fanfare, probably because it won’t make much of a difference.

When developers get our information, and that of the acquaintances in our contacts list, it’s theirs to use and move around unseen by Apple. It can be sold to data brokers, shared with political campaigns, or posted on the internet. The new rule forbids that, but Apple does nothing to make it technically difficult for developers to harvest the information.

Continue reading

DuckDuckGo CEO explains how they make money without profiling users, and how Google and Facebook could do the same

Gabriel Weinberg via Quora:

Alarmingly, Google now deploys hidden trackers on 76% of websites across the web to monitor your behavior and Facebook has hidden trackers on about 25% of websites, according to the Princeton Web Transparency & Accountability Project. It is likely that Google and/or Facebook are watching you on most sites you visit, in addition to tracking you when using their products.

As a result, these two companies have amassed huge data profiles on individuals, which can include interests, past purchases, search, browsing and location history, and much more. This personal data is stored indefinitely and used for invasive targeted advertising that can follow you around the Internet.

Via Twitter:

Hey Ferrari, the CN Tower is not in Montreal; D-Day; Facebook caught again

Walmart will pay for its workers to earn a college degree – but only in the U.S. – NY Times

What’s going on in your child’s brain when you read them a story? – NPR

Not enough cows are getting massages, leading to a shortage of luxury goods – Bloomberg // Where does one apply to become a Cow Masseur?

Apple’s Craig Federighi provided a perfect explanation for why the iPad is a bad computer replacementInsider // I agree. It’s even a pain to do some simple tasks such as cut and paste.

Do You Like Your Name? – NY Times

Facebook shared your data with at least four Chinese tech companies — Huawei, Lenovo, Oppo, and TCL — since at least 2010 – NY Times, Globe & Mail, Reuters // It’s scummy businesses like Facebook that make it necessary to have tough privacy and data protection laws.

  • ‘Sure looks like Zuckerberg lied to Congress‘ – LA Times // This was intentional and he should face the consequences.
  • Can Facebook be cut down to size? – NY Times

As a Canadian, a native Montrealer, and a huge Formula 1 fan, this is embarrassing. The Ferrari race team tweeted a video that identified the Toronto skyline as belonging to Montreal. That video has since been replaced.  And in the typical Ferrari way, there is no apology. The 2018 Canadian Grand Prix takes place in Montreal (the one without the CN Tower) on Sunday. To add insult to injury, the race is contested on the Gilles Villeneuve circuit, named in honour of one of Ferrari’s most passionate and loved race drivers. More at CTV News

March for Our Lives; Facebook sold away your personal info, now they want your naked photos; Volcan de Fuego; Banning alcohol from flights; No-one answers anymore

Survivors from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High high school shooting are not taking a summer vacation. They have planned a campaign, aimed at the four million Americans turning 18 this year, for stricter gun laws, with a plan for a 60-day, 20-state bus tour to rally the youth vote ahead of November’s U.S. midterm elections. The March for Our Lives: Road to Change tour will start on June 15 in Chicago with a peace march.

Antarctica’s first Pride celebration – Earther

Microsoft is buying Github for $7.5 billion

At least 25 people are dead after the Volcan de Fuego erupted in Guatemala Globe & MailCBC

Facebook wants your naked photosCBC

Facebook gave over 60 device makers, including Apple, Amazon, and Samsung, deep access to users’ personal infoNY TimesBBCTelegraphBloombergThe HillFortune

Bayer to retire Monsanto name, but not it’s products – Reuters

No-one answers the phone anymore – The Atlantic

  • How I’ve learned to get someone to put down their phone and listenFast Company

Alcohol should be banned on flights – WSJ

The U.S.A.’s National Security Agency (NSA) posters from the 50s and 60s [pdf] – Government Attic

You may have overpaid for your used car; Facebook’s Instagram; Binge-watching comedies; CarMax is the ultimate used car salesman; The Marshmallow Test

New York’s last remaining independent bookshopsThe Guardian

Ted Dabney, a founder of Atari and a creator of Pong, dies at 81 – NY Times

Stratechery’s Ben Thompson: Facebook’s Instagram acquisition was the greatest regulatory failure of the past decade – Recode

Comedies Make the Best Binge-Watching – Vulture

Affluence, not willpower, is why some kids are better at the Marshmallow TestThe Atlantic

Here’s why CarMax makes more money on used cars than anyone else – Jalopnik

“The primary reason for this is simple—most people are overpaying.”

Social networks are being used to illegally sell prescription medicationsBuzzFeed

China boasted that their healthy life expectancy is now better than in the US — and they’re right – Insider


June 3

1799: The Island of Saint John changed it’s name to Prince Edward Island.

Roxham Road; The perfect Grilled Cheese Sandwich; Film camera; Travel as a rite of passage

The perfect Grilled Cheese Sandwich!

Worth experiencing: Interactive: Roxham – National Film Board of Canada

In early 2017, the number of asylum seekers arriving at Roxham Road sharply increased. This quiet and practically unknown road between the United States and Canada became the location with the largest number of irregular border crossings in the country.

Canon has sold it’s last film cameraPetaPixel

Mamoudou Gassama: Travelling is a rite of passage for many Malians – BBC

What if all guns suddenly disappeared? – BBC

More than 20 years ago, Vancouver doctors started noticing Purdue Pharma’s OxyContin was being abused, and yet the drug company continued to promoted it as being less addictive – NY Times // Is that enough to show criminal intent?

  • More than 2 years into public health emergency, officials in B.C. still struggle to slow deaths – CBC
  • ‘Unintended Consequences’ — Inside the fallout of America’s crackdown on opioids – The Washington Post (paywall)

Teens dump Facebook for YouTube, Instagram and Snapchat – TechCrunch

Get smarter and healthier; The first nylon stockings go on sale; Face recognition tools are staggeringly inaccurate

Apple has 55 self-driving cars registered in California – TechCrunch

Facebook closed 583 million fake accounts in first three months of 2018 – The Guardian

The number of kidnappings is surging in Mexico – VOX

Average house price in Canada fell 11% in past year – CBC

  • National home sales fall to lowest level in 5 years – CTV News

A 69-year-old double amputee from China summits Everest – Adventure Journal via Adventure Trend

Great employees quit instead of admitting they are unhappyForbes

Running out of Japanese whiskey – Kotaku

Taking a stand for what you believe in: Google employees resign in protest over work for Pentagon – Gizmodo

Watch: Learning to play an instrument can help anyone become healthier and smarter – Life Noggin via YouTube

Face recognition tools used by police are ‘staggeringly inaccurate’ – BBC

How a newspaper diesPolitico

~~~

May 15

1919The Winnipeg general strike: 24,000 organized and unorganized workers in Winnipeg walked off the job. Another 6,000 would soon join them. It was the start of the largest strike in Canadian history.

1940: The first nylon stockings go on sale; 780,000 pairs are snapped up on the first day. Four million pairs sold out in four days. The material was developed by a scientist at DuPont.

1941: New York Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio begins his record 56-game hitting streak with a single off Edgar Smith of the Chicago White Sox.

Here is some of the personal information Facebook does not include in it’s ‘Download Your Data’ tool

Facebook claims users can view the personal information they have collected about you. But the download doesn’t include everything Facebook knows about you.

Nitasha Tiku, Wired:

“Download Your Data” hardly tells you everythingFacebook knows about you. Among the information not included:

  •  information Facebook collects about your browsing history
  • information Facebook collects about the apps you visit and your activity within those apps
  • the advertisers who uploaded your contact information to Facebook more than two months earlier
  • ads that you interacted with more than two months prior

Download Your Data is particularly spotty when it comes to the information Facebook taps to display ads. Typically, Facebook uses information it collects or buys to place users into categories that advertisers can target. This can include data a user provides explicitly (your age), implicitly (which browser you use) or unknowingly (information on purchases from loyalty cards).

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