Robert Vinet

A VOYAGER​

Tag: Hiking

Norway is teaching the rest of us how to travel

Shannon Dell, BBC:

Although a traditional right from ancient times, allemansratten has been part of the Outdoor Recreation Act since 1957. The rules are simple: you can sleep anywhere as long as you stay at least 150m away from the nearest residency, and if you sleep more than two nights in the same place, you must ask the landowner’s permission. Most important, though, is that those who practice allemansratten should have respect for nature, the wildlife and the locals.

Norway is not the only country to practice this ‘right to roam’ law. Other countries include Finland, Iceland, Sweden, Latvia, Austria, the Czech Republic and Switzerland. What separates Norway from the rest, however, is fjellvettreglene.

And

Fjellvettreglene, which encourages people to have a healthy and respectful relationship with nature, has since become a crucial part of Norwegian culture. It includes points such as planning your trip and reporting wherever you go, bringing necessary equipment to assist yourself and others, always knowing where you are, seeking shelter if necessary and feeling no shame in turning around.

“Fjellvettreglene taught us nature doesn’t care about our egos. We should show as much respect and take as much caution as possible.

And

Fascination for the outdoors comes naturally to Norwegians because of friluftsliv. Coined in 1859, the philosophical concept of friluftsliv means ‘free-air life’ and is used to illustrate the raw dedication and passion Norwegians have for nature. It equates the sensation of going backpacking in the mountains or camping on the shore with the feeling of being home.

But while friluftsliv encourages people to practice allemansratten and allemansratten encourages the love for friluftsliv, fjellvettreglene is the education to preserve and protect nature.

Lucy Barnard is attempting become the first woman to walk the length of the world

Lucy Barnard is attempting to set a world record by walking 30,000 km, length of the world, from Argentina to Alaska. If she reaches her goal, the 35 years old Australian will become the first woman to walk that length.

Jano Gibson, writing in ABC News:

“It’s meant to be 30,000 kilometres but with all the to-ing and fro-ing and getting lost and trying to take shortcuts that end up being far longer, I really couldn’t give you a true number,” Ms Barnard said.

There’s just one rule: she can’t use any motorised transport.

The vast majority of the journey is by foot, but several water crossings along the route require a kayak.

Outside Magazine: Thru Hiking the Grand Canyon

In 2015, filmmaker Pete Mcbride and Kevin Fedarko set out to hike the entire 700 mile length of the Grand Canyon National Park in an effort film and highlight the numerous threats facing the canyon and its future.

Watch the trailer to the forthcoming film, Dust in the Blood.

 

© 2019 Robert Vinet

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑