Robert Vinet

Insatiably Curious

Tag: Norway

The Best of the Best Countries in the World

The Best of the Best, according to U.S. News & World Report:

  1. Switzerland
  2. Canada
  3. Germany
  4. United Kingdom
  5. Japan
  6. Sweden
  7. Australia
  8. United States
  9. France
  10. Netherlands
  11. Denmark
  12. Norway
  13. New Zealand
  14. Finland
  15. Italy
  16. Singapore
  17. Austria
  18. Luxembourg
  19. Spain
  20. China

More:

Katherine Lagrave, Condé Nast Traveler:

There’s a “best of” list for nearly everything—the best countries for expats, the best places to go in 2018, the best pizza in Italy (you’re welcome). Now, U.S. News & World Report has released a veritable best-of-the-best list, with its annual “Best Countries” index. This study is no joke: They evaluated 80 countries and surveyed 21,000 people from four regions (the Americas, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East and Africa); places were graded 65 different ways, for how well they rank in “citizenship,” “cultural influence,” “education,” “heritage,” “power,” “quality of life,” to name a few. Here, the ten best countries in the world, and what they’re, well, best for. Counting down… This gallery was originally published in 2016. It has been updated with new results.

Norway looking to make all short-haul flights electric by 2040

Charlotte Beale, writing for the World Economic Forum:

Journeys taking up to 1.5 hours – which includes all domestic Norwegian routes and those to neighbouring Scandinavian capitals – should be entirely electric, said Norwegian airport operator Avinor’s chief executive, Dag Falk-Petersen.

Norway worries they are winning too many Olympic medals

Norway is so worried about dominating cross country skiing and other sports that they offer aid to other countries to compete against them, for fear the rest of the world will lose interest in those sports they love.

David Segal, The New York Times:

Surpassing its own lofty expectations, Norway has delivered the greatest performance in the history of the Winter Games, winning a total of 38 medals, 13 of them gold. A nation of only five million people has crushed all comers, including sports behemoths like Germany and the United States, in the events Norwegians care about the most.

 

Norway is teaching the rest of us how to travel

Shannon Dell, BBC:

Although a traditional right from ancient times, allemansratten has been part of the Outdoor Recreation Act since 1957. The rules are simple: you can sleep anywhere as long as you stay at least 150m away from the nearest residency, and if you sleep more than two nights in the same place, you must ask the landowner’s permission. Most important, though, is that those who practice allemansratten should have respect for nature, the wildlife and the locals.

Norway is not the only country to practice this ‘right to roam’ law. Other countries include Finland, Iceland, Sweden, Latvia, Austria, the Czech Republic and Switzerland. What separates Norway from the rest, however, is fjellvettreglene.

And

Fjellvettreglene, which encourages people to have a healthy and respectful relationship with nature, has since become a crucial part of Norwegian culture. It includes points such as planning your trip and reporting wherever you go, bringing necessary equipment to assist yourself and others, always knowing where you are, seeking shelter if necessary and feeling no shame in turning around.

“Fjellvettreglene taught us nature doesn’t care about our egos. We should show as much respect and take as much caution as possible.

And

Fascination for the outdoors comes naturally to Norwegians because of friluftsliv. Coined in 1859, the philosophical concept of friluftsliv means ‘free-air life’ and is used to illustrate the raw dedication and passion Norwegians have for nature. It equates the sensation of going backpacking in the mountains or camping on the shore with the feeling of being home.

But while friluftsliv encourages people to practice allemansratten and allemansratten encourages the love for friluftsliv, fjellvettreglene is the education to preserve and protect nature.

Video: Winter Olympics Day 9 Highlights

CBC Sports:

Day 9 of the 2018 Olympic Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea saw Canadian freestyle skier Alex Beaulieu-Marchand land on the podium with a score of 92.40 and a bronze in the men’s ski slopestyle final. Norway’s Braaten Oystein took gold with the top score of 95.00, followed by American Nick Goepper who earned silver with a score of 93.60.

Canada secured a spot in the quarter-finals after a 4-0 win over South Korea in men’s hockey but in curling Sweden stole a win over Canada 5-2. Women’s curling team turned things around with a 10-18 victory over Switzerland.

Europeans stole the show on the mountain and plains as Austrian skier Marcel Hirscher became the second athlete to earn two individual golds in Pyeongchang after winning the men’s giant slalom. Hirscher who also won the men’s alpine combined and biathlete Laura Dahlmeier are the only Olympians so far to have done so. Hirscher has a shot at more.

Oleksandr Abramenko won gold in freestyle skiing aerials while Olivier Rochon, the only Canadian to reach the men’s aerials finals, finished fifth and did not make it to the podium. The men’s team pursuit speed skaters failed to advance to the semis. On the women’s side, Marsha Hudey was 10th and Heather McLean finished 14th in the women’s 500-metre finals while Nao Kodaira of Japan took the top spot followed by Lee Sang-Hwa (KOR) in second and Karolina Erbanova (CZE) in third.

Norway won their 11th cross-country medal and 5th gold in the men’s 4×10-kilometre relay while Canada, competing without Alex Harvey after he dropped out of the event, finished ninth.

Northern Norway hotel produces more energy than it uses

AnneMarie McCarthy, writing for Lonely Planet:

The Svart hotel uses 85% less energy compared to a standard, modern hotel but with the help of its own solar power, will actually produce more energy than it uses. This point is key to building the hotel in the planned site; at the foot of the Svartisen glacier in northern Norway.

Svart extends in a circle from the shoreline, giving guests a panoramic view of the clear waters of Holandsfjorden fjord and the surrounding mountains. In the summer, guests can stroll around the hotel on the boardwalk and in warmer weather they can even kayak underneath the structure.

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