Robert Vinet

A​ Passionately Curious Bloke

Tag: Ontario

Another senseless mass shooting. This one in Canada

Three dead, including shooter, 12 injured in Toronto mass shooting

Globe and Mail:

What we know so far:

  • Two victims are dead.
  • 12 people are injured.
  • The shooter is dead. It is unclear if he died by suicide or was shot by police.
  • Toronto Police have not released the identity of the shooter. SIU announced Monday morning he was 29 years old.
  • Police confirmed the shooter used a handgun, but refused to speculate on motive.

Ontario is returning to a 1998 sex-ed curriculum. Some teachers are fighting back

Global News:

The new Education Minister, Lisa Thompson, announced Wednesday that schools in the fall would go back to teaching the 1998 curriculum, which predates same-sex marriage in Canada by seven years, and doesn’t include topics like cyber-bullying, social media or LGTBQ issues.

Canada’s newest UNESCO World Heritage Site is boreal forest important to First Nations cultures

CBC:

Pimachiowin Aki is nearly 30,000 sq. km. of boreal forest that encompasses the traditional lands of four Anishinaabe First Nations as well as Atikaki and South Atikaki Provincial Parks in Manitoba, Woodland Caribou Provincial Park and the Eagle–Snowshoe Conservation Reserve in Ontario.

In Anishinaabemowin, Pimachiowin Aki translates to “the land that gives life.”

From UNESCO:

Pimachiowin Aki (“The Land That Gives Life”) is a forest landscape crossed by rivers and studded with lakes, wetlands, and boreal forest. It forms part of the ancestral home of the Anishinaabeg, an indigenous people living from fishing, hunting and gathering. The area encompasses the traditional lands of four Anishinaabeg communities (Bloodvein River, Little Grand Rapids, Pauingassi and Poplar River). It is an exceptional example of the cultural tradition of Ji-ganawendamang Gidakiiminaan (“keeping the land”) which consists of honouring the gifts of the Creator, respecting all forms of life and maintaining harmonious relations with others. A complex network of livelihood sites, habitation sites, travel routes and ceremonial sites, often linked by waterways, embodies this tradition.

More at Globe and Mail

March for Our Lives; Facebook sold away your personal info, now they want your naked photos; Volcan de Fuego; Banning alcohol from flights; No-one answers anymore

Survivors from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High high school shooting are not taking a summer vacation. They have planned a campaign, aimed at the four million Americans turning 18 this year, for stricter gun laws, with a plan for a 60-day, 20-state bus tour to rally the youth vote ahead of November’s U.S. midterm elections. The March for Our Lives: Road to Change tour will start on June 15 in Chicago with a peace march.

Antarctica’s first Pride celebration – Earther

Microsoft is buying Github for $7.5 billion

At least 25 people are dead after the Volcan de Fuego erupted in Guatemala Globe & MailCBC

Facebook wants your naked photosCBC

Facebook gave over 60 device makers, including Apple, Amazon, and Samsung, deep access to users’ personal infoNY TimesBBCTelegraphBloombergThe HillFortune

Bayer to retire Monsanto name, but not it’s products – Reuters

No-one answers the phone anymore – The Atlantic

  • How I’ve learned to get someone to put down their phone and listenFast Company

Alcohol should be banned on flights – WSJ

The U.S.A.’s National Security Agency (NSA) posters from the 50s and 60s [pdf] – Government Attic

Best summer fruit for Memorial Day, Learning to code in middle-age; The Governor General in space; Message in a bottle, Quintuplets, Montreal Expos

Today our American friends honour the men and women who served and sacrificed their lives for the United States. Happy Memorial Day.

Mamoudou Gassama became an instant hero when he scaled the outside of a building to save a dangling child. He is now being offered citizenship by French president – CBC

California looking at stronger data privacy measuresNPR

A middle-aged journalist, Andrew Smith, learns to code and app – 1843 Magazine

The 5 best summer fruits, according to the NY Times

World’s oldest known message in a bottle found near Perth, Australia – CBC

All the books Bill Gates has recommended over the last eight years – Quartz

FBI advises router users to reboot now to kill malware infecting 500,000 devices – ArsTechnica

Alan Bean, 4th Person to Walk on the Moon, Dies at 86 – NY Times

More than 1,000 Canada Revenue Agency employees have been disciplined for misconduct over past 4 years. That comes out to an average of one person every working day. Failuring to protect the agency’s information was the reason in about 40 per cent of cases. – CBC

In some provinces, Bell, Rogers, and Telus, are all offering mobile plans with extra data, in response to Shaw‘s promotion. But Canadians still pay some of the highest prices in the industrialized world for cellular data.


May 28

1927: The House of Commons approved the old-age pension plan.

1934: Annette, Cecile, Yvonne, Marie, and ÉmilieThe Dionne quintuplets – are born to Oliva and Elzire Dionne in Callander, Ontario. They were the first quintuplets to survive for more than a few days.

1995: Jacques Villeneuve becomes the first Canadian to win the Indianapolis 500.

2003Patrick Roy, one of the NHL’s premier goalies, retired after 18 seasons with the Montreal Canadiens and Colorado Avalanche. He won 551 games during the regular season and 151 in playoffs.

2005: Justin Trudeau marries Sophie Grégoire in Montreal, Quebec.

2016: Canada’s federal Conservative Party ends it’s opposition to same-sex marriage. At their party convention in Vancouver, members voted to end the party’s opposition to gay marriage. Same-sex marriage has been legal across Canada since the Civil Marriage Act was passed in 2005.

~~~

May 27

1893: The Ontario government created Algonquin Provincial Park, Canada’s first provincial park.

1911: Vincent Price was born.

1968: Montreal is awarded a baseball franchise. The Montreal Expos were the first Major League Baseball franchise located outside the United States.

1999: Canadian astronaut Julie Payette flew on the Space Shuttle Discovery from May 27 to June 6, as part of the crew of STS-96. She would later be appointed Governor General of Canada.

~~~

May 26

1603: Samuel de Champlain, reaches Tadoussac, on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River, and sets foot in New France for the first time.

B.C. joins Alberta, Ontario and Quebec in banning payment for blood and plasma

There are no clinics in British Columbia that pay people for their blood, but newly introduced legislation is meant to prevent any from opening.

The rest of the provinces need to follow their example.

via The Canadian Press

Couple’s foster children removed because they refused to lie about the Easter Bunny

What a hare-brained reason for removing the children.

An Ontario, Canada court has ruled that a couple’s Canadian charter rights were violated when a children’s aid society worker closed the couple’s foster home over their refusal to tell two young girls under their care that the Easter Bunny is real.

In a stinging indictment of the actions of the Children’s Aid Society of Hamilton, a court judgment declared the CAS violated the foster parent’s right to freedom of religion and freedom of expression when the children were taken from their home and their fostering agreement terminated over the Easter Bunny dilemma.

Derek and Frances Baars, who lived in Hamilton at the time but have since moved to Edmonton, sued the Children’s Aid Society last year, saying a CAS worker insisted they proactively tell two girls in their care, aged three and four, the Easter Bunny was genuine, despite the couple’s belief that all lying is wrong.

The Baars sought no money, only a court declaration their rights were violated and that they not be blackballed from future fostering.

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