Insatiably Curious

Tag: Privacy (Page 1 of 2)

British Airways Travellers’ Credit Cards Hacked

Data breach leaves 380,000 customers vulnerable.

Hackers obtained the credit card details of some 380,000 British Airways travellers during a two-week data breach this summer that leaves the customers vulnerable to financial fraud, the airline says.

CEO Alex Cruz, said Friday that enough data was stolen to allow criminals to use credit card information for illicit purposes, and that police are investigating. Travellers who booked on the company website or mobile app from Aug. 21 until Sept. 5 may have been affected.


More at the CBC, Sunday Times

 

23andMe sold your DNA data to big pharma

Vice:

You really, really shouldn’t give your DNA to genomics companies like 23andMe or Ancestry. As the recent arrest of the Golden State Killer reminded us, these genetic databases are a goldmine for law enforcement. Catching serial killers isn’t bad, of course, but problems start to arise when, say, these genetic databases are used to target people for deportation.

But in case you needed another reason why voluntarily giving your DNA to companies is a bad idea, on Wednesday the genomic-ancestry company 23andMe announced it was forking over its DNA data to the world’s ninth-largest pharmaceutical company, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). The exclusive partnership gives GSK access to 23andMe’s database that includes the genomes of over 5 million people.

More: GlaxoSmithKline makes $300M investment in 23andMe, forms 50-50 R&D pact

DuckDuckGo CEO explains how they make money without profiling users, and how Google and Facebook could do the same

Gabriel Weinberg via Quora:

Alarmingly, Google now deploys hidden trackers on 76% of websites across the web to monitor your behavior and Facebook has hidden trackers on about 25% of websites, according to the Princeton Web Transparency & Accountability Project. It is likely that Google and/or Facebook are watching you on most sites you visit, in addition to tracking you when using their products.

As a result, these two companies have amassed huge data profiles on individuals, which can include interests, past purchases, search, browsing and location history, and much more. This personal data is stored indefinitely and used for invasive targeted advertising that can follow you around the Internet.

Via Twitter:

Hey Ferrari, the CN Tower is not in Montreal; D-Day; Facebook caught again

Walmart will pay for its workers to earn a college degree – but only in the U.S. – NY Times

What’s going on in your child’s brain when you read them a story? – NPR

Not enough cows are getting massages, leading to a shortage of luxury goods – Bloomberg // Where does one apply to become a Cow Masseur?

Apple’s Craig Federighi provided a perfect explanation for why the iPad is a bad computer replacementInsider // I agree. It’s even a pain to do some simple tasks such as cut and paste.

Do You Like Your Name? – NY Times

Facebook shared your data with at least four Chinese tech companies — Huawei, Lenovo, Oppo, and TCL — since at least 2010 – NY Times, Globe & Mail, Reuters // It’s scummy businesses like Facebook that make it necessary to have tough privacy and data protection laws.

  • ‘Sure looks like Zuckerberg lied to Congress‘ – LA Times // This was intentional and he should face the consequences.
  • Can Facebook be cut down to size? – NY Times

As a Canadian, a native Montrealer, and a huge Formula 1 fan, this is embarrassing. The Ferrari race team tweeted a video that identified the Toronto skyline as belonging to Montreal. That video has since been replaced.  And in the typical Ferrari way, there is no apology. The 2018 Canadian Grand Prix takes place in Montreal (the one without the CN Tower) on Sunday. To add insult to injury, the race is contested on the Gilles Villeneuve circuit, named in honour of one of Ferrari’s most passionate and loved race drivers. More at CTV News

March for Our Lives; Facebook sold away your personal info, now they want your naked photos; Volcan de Fuego; Banning alcohol from flights; No-one answers anymore

Survivors from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High high school shooting are not taking a summer vacation. They have planned a campaign, aimed at the four million Americans turning 18 this year, for stricter gun laws, with a plan for a 60-day, 20-state bus tour to rally the youth vote ahead of November’s U.S. midterm elections. The March for Our Lives: Road to Change tour will start on June 15 in Chicago with a peace march.

Antarctica’s first Pride celebration – Earther

Microsoft is buying Github for $7.5 billion

At least 25 people are dead after the Volcan de Fuego erupted in Guatemala Globe & MailCBC

Facebook wants your naked photosCBC

Facebook gave over 60 device makers, including Apple, Amazon, and Samsung, deep access to users’ personal infoNY TimesBBCTelegraphBloombergThe HillFortune

Bayer to retire Monsanto name, but not it’s products – Reuters

No-one answers the phone anymore – The Atlantic

  • How I’ve learned to get someone to put down their phone and listenFast Company

Alcohol should be banned on flights – WSJ

The U.S.A.’s National Security Agency (NSA) posters from the 50s and 60s [pdf] – Government Attic

Best summer fruit for Memorial Day, Learning to code in middle-age; The Governor General in space; Message in a bottle, Quintuplets, Montreal Expos

Today our American friends honour the men and women who served and sacrificed their lives for the United States. Happy Memorial Day.

Mamoudou Gassama became an instant hero when he scaled the outside of a building to save a dangling child. He is now being offered citizenship by French president – CBC

California looking at stronger data privacy measuresNPR

A middle-aged journalist, Andrew Smith, learns to code and app – 1843 Magazine

The 5 best summer fruits, according to the NY Times

World’s oldest known message in a bottle found near Perth, Australia – CBC

All the books Bill Gates has recommended over the last eight years – Quartz

FBI advises router users to reboot now to kill malware infecting 500,000 devices – ArsTechnica

Alan Bean, 4th Person to Walk on the Moon, Dies at 86 – NY Times

More than 1,000 Canada Revenue Agency employees have been disciplined for misconduct over past 4 years. That comes out to an average of one person every working day. Failuring to protect the agency’s information was the reason in about 40 per cent of cases. – CBC

In some provinces, Bell, Rogers, and Telus, are all offering mobile plans with extra data, in response to Shaw‘s promotion. But Canadians still pay some of the highest prices in the industrialized world for cellular data.


May 28

1927: The House of Commons approved the old-age pension plan.

1934: Annette, Cecile, Yvonne, Marie, and ÉmilieThe Dionne quintuplets – are born to Oliva and Elzire Dionne in Callander, Ontario. They were the first quintuplets to survive for more than a few days.

1995: Jacques Villeneuve becomes the first Canadian to win the Indianapolis 500.

2003Patrick Roy, one of the NHL’s premier goalies, retired after 18 seasons with the Montreal Canadiens and Colorado Avalanche. He won 551 games during the regular season and 151 in playoffs.

2005: Justin Trudeau marries Sophie Grégoire in Montreal, Quebec.

2016: Canada’s federal Conservative Party ends it’s opposition to same-sex marriage. At their party convention in Vancouver, members voted to end the party’s opposition to gay marriage. Same-sex marriage has been legal across Canada since the Civil Marriage Act was passed in 2005.

~~~

May 27

1893: The Ontario government created Algonquin Provincial Park, Canada’s first provincial park.

1911: Vincent Price was born.

1968: Montreal is awarded a baseball franchise. The Montreal Expos were the first Major League Baseball franchise located outside the United States.

1999: Canadian astronaut Julie Payette flew on the Space Shuttle Discovery from May 27 to June 6, as part of the crew of STS-96. She would later be appointed Governor General of Canada.

~~~

May 26

1603: Samuel de Champlain, reaches Tadoussac, on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River, and sets foot in New France for the first time.

Canada’s privacy watchdog says there is a ‘significant gap’ in oversight of how political parties use voter data

Bill Curry, The Globe and Mail:

Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien’s long-standing call for more powers over internet giants and political parties is gaining support from government and opposition MPs as a committee examines the misuse of Facebook data for political campaigns.

Mr. Therrien was the opening witness Tuesday as the House of Commons committee on access to information, privacy and ethics launched an examination into the international controversy over Facebook’s protection of its users’ personal information.

The commissioner told MPs that Canada is an outlier internationally when it comes to ensuring independent oversight of how political parties use the large amounts of data that they gather on Canadian voters.

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