Robert Vinet

A​ Passionately Curious Bloke

Tag: Water

How much water should we drink every day?

It’s important to listen to what our bodies are telling us.

Jessica Brown, writing for the BBC:

Water is, of course, important. Making up around two-thirds of our body weight, water carries nutrients and waste products around our bodies, regulates our temperature, acts as a lubricant and shock absorber in our joints and plays a role in most chemical reactions happening inside us.

We’re constantly losing water through sweat, urination and breathing. Ensuring we have enough water is a fine balance, and crucial to avoiding dehydration. The symptoms of dehydration can become detectable when we lose between 1-2% of our body’s water and we continue to deteriorate until we top our fluids back up. In rare cases, such dehydration can be fatal.

And

“One of fallacies of the 8×8 rule is its stark over-simplification of how we as organisms respond to the environment we’re in,” says Rosenburg. “We ought to think of fluid requirement in the same way as energy requirement, where we talk about the temperature we’re in and level of physical activity were engaged in.”

Most experts tend to agree we don’t need to be concerned about drinking an arbitrary amount of water per day: our bodies signal to us when we’re thirsty, much like they do when we’re hungry or tired. The only health benefit of drinking more than you need, it seems, will be the extra calories you expend by running to the loo more often.

Read the whole article at BBC.

Watch: Ray Mears’ Extreme Survival – The Sahara Desert

The Sahara is the largest hot desert and the third largest desert in the world after Antarctica and the Arctic. Its area of 9,200,000 square kilometres is comparable to the area of China or the United States. More

Watch: How to filter water in the backcountry

How far will Stewart Resnick and his Wonderful Company go to irrigated his orchards?

Mark Arax investigates for The California Sunday Magazine.

Stewart Resnick is the biggest farmer in the United States, a fact he has tried to keep hidden while he has shaped what we eat, transformed California’s landscape, and ruled entire towns.

But the one thing he can’t control is what he’s most dependent on — water.

Dangerously Low on Water, Cape Town Faces ‘Day Zero’ … Where next?

This is the first major cosmopolitan city to be threatened by the lack of drinking water. Cape Town’s taps could be turned off in April if they don’t receive a significant amount of rain before then. What happens when four million people don’t have access to drinking water?

But Cape Town is not alone. We are seeing other regions with similar threats.

Norimitsu Onishi and Somini Sengupta, writing for the NY Times:

The government cautions that the Day Zero threat will surpass anything a major city has faced since World War II or the Sept. 11 attacks. Talks are underway with South Africa’s police because “normal policing will be entirely inadequate.” Residents, their nerves increasingly frayed, speak in whispers of impending chaos.

The reason for the alarm is simple: The city’s water supply is dangerously close to running dry.

If water levels keep falling, Cape Town will declare Day Zero in less than three months. Taps in homes and businesses will be turned off until the rains come. The city’s four million residents will have to line up for water rations at 200 collection points. The city is bracing for the impact on public health and social order.

Also read: Why Cape Town Is Running Out of Water, and Who’s Next – Craig Welch, National Geographic

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